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Dunharrow
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Post by Dunharrow » 6 months ago

Krishnath wrote:
6 months ago
Dunharrow wrote:
6 months ago
Talking about the chip shortage - do you know that a lot of equipment used in medicine and biological research need chips?
Lead time on common equipment like CO2 incubators has skyrocketed because of the chip shortage.
Maybe it will improve this summer as people will be outside more and hopefully buying fewer computers, TVs, PS5s, etc...
Because if demand continues to be this high it will be another year or more before manufacturing can catch up.
The prices will unfortunately not decrease until the chip production increases, and that won't happen until the mining and transport of "rare earths" normalize, which won't happen until the pandemic gets under control. And the issue with that is that there are forces at work that are actively sabotaging the efforts to get it under control because they believe they will gain from it continuing.
I personally am less concerned about price than availability. Prices won't go down - they don't need to go down. If people are willing to pay more then the new increased price becomes the new base price.
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Post by Krishnath » 6 months ago

Dunharrow wrote:
6 months ago
Krishnath wrote:
6 months ago
Dunharrow wrote:
6 months ago
Talking about the chip shortage - do you know that a lot of equipment used in medicine and biological research need chips?
Lead time on common equipment like CO2 incubators has skyrocketed because of the chip shortage.
Maybe it will improve this summer as people will be outside more and hopefully buying fewer computers, TVs, PS5s, etc...
Because if demand continues to be this high it will be another year or more before manufacturing can catch up.
The prices will unfortunately not decrease until the chip production increases, and that won't happen until the mining and transport of "rare earths" normalize, which won't happen until the pandemic gets under control. And the issue with that is that there are forces at work that are actively sabotaging the efforts to get it under control because they believe they will gain from it continuing.
I personally am less concerned about price than availability. Prices won't go down - they don't need to go down. If people are willing to pay more then the new increased price becomes the new base price.
Most people aren't willing to pay the new prices. Only the people who are already wealthy are willing to pay those prices. I for one am not willing to pay twice what I get in my disability pension to get a graphics card. The prices are entirely caused by scarcity, and nothing else. Once the production normalizes the companies will have to choose, either keep the prices high and carter to a tiny clientele, or reduce the prices to a level where a majority of people can afford. If they keep the prices high, they will risk eventually going bankrupt as other cheaper alternatives become available, and to be honest, most of them can't afford to make that gamble.
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Post by RxPhantom » 6 months ago

I finally, FINALLY got a copy of Scalding Tarn of my very own! I ordered the non-foil Christmas Superdrop* and WotC messed up the Bob Ross lands and gave everyone who ordered non-foil the foil one, and vice versa. My LGS owner considered it a 1 for 1 swap. I know this seems lame and lots of people have enemy fetches, but I have very few.

*Ok ok I know I know they got me with the FOMO. But this time, the Secret Lairs were full of cards that I'll actually use AND with art styles that resonated with me...even if I hate myself a little bit for it.
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Post by MeowZeDung » 6 months ago

Enemy fetches. Blargh. Someday I'll have my tarn and mesa... maybe...

WotC is in a bit of a bind though since they can't easily reprint in a standard set. My best hope is a MH# set or Zendikar Remastered I guess. I just know the second I splurge and buy they will go and reprint the stupid things.
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Post by Rumpy5897 » 6 months ago

MeowZeDung wrote:
6 months ago
Enemy fetches. Blargh. Someday I'll have my tarn and mesa... maybe...

WotC is in a bit of a bind though since they can't easily reprint in a standard set. My best hope is a MH# set or Zendikar Remastered I guess. I just know the second I splurge and buy they will go and reprint the stupid things.
They're confirmed for MH2 at rare. Easy to forget with perpetual hype.
 
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Dunharrow
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Post by Dunharrow » 6 months ago

Krishnath wrote:
6 months ago
Dunharrow wrote:
6 months ago
Krishnath wrote:
6 months ago

The prices will unfortunately not decrease until the chip production increases, and that won't happen until the mining and transport of "rare earths" normalize, which won't happen until the pandemic gets under control. And the issue with that is that there are forces at work that are actively sabotaging the efforts to get it under control because they believe they will gain from it continuing.
I personally am less concerned about price than availability. Prices won't go down - they don't need to go down. If people are willing to pay more then the new increased price becomes the new base price.
Most people aren't willing to pay the new prices. Only the people who are already wealthy are willing to pay those prices. I for one am not willing to pay twice what I get in my disability pension to get a graphics card. The prices are entirely caused by scarcity, and nothing else. Once the production normalizes the companies will have to choose, either keep the prices high and carter to a tiny clientele, or reduce the prices to a level where a majority of people can afford. If they keep the prices high, they will risk eventually going bankrupt as other cheaper alternatives become available, and to be honest, most of them can't afford to make that gamble.
I mean, sure, for the price of graphics cards.
I meant if car manufacturers and other manufacturers are okay buying chips at this increased price, then the chip manufacturers will have no reason to decrease prices (maybe a little, but not to pre-covid levels).

So then the companies making graphics cards will need to decide between increasing their prices or eating the increased costs. They will probably settle somewhere part way for products that have more price-sensitive consumers.

I am not very 'in-the-know', but I feel like most microchips are sold to other industries than computer components.
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MeowZeDung
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Post by MeowZeDung » 6 months ago

Rumpy5897 wrote:
6 months ago
MeowZeDung wrote:
6 months ago
Enemy fetches. Blargh. Someday I'll have my tarn and mesa... maybe...

WotC is in a bit of a bind though since they can't easily reprint in a standard set. My best hope is a MH# set or Zendikar Remastered I guess. I just know the second I splurge and buy they will go and reprint the stupid things.
They're confirmed for MH2 at rare. Easy to forget with perpetual hype.
Ah. Good to know. I'll sit and wait then.
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Post by Krishnath » 6 months ago

Dunharrow wrote:
6 months ago
Krishnath wrote:
6 months ago
Dunharrow wrote:
6 months ago

I personally am less concerned about price than availability. Prices won't go down - they don't need to go down. If people are willing to pay more then the new increased price becomes the new base price.
Most people aren't willing to pay the new prices. Only the people who are already wealthy are willing to pay those prices. I for one am not willing to pay twice what I get in my disability pension to get a graphics card. The prices are entirely caused by scarcity, and nothing else. Once the production normalizes the companies will have to choose, either keep the prices high and carter to a tiny clientele, or reduce the prices to a level where a majority of people can afford. If they keep the prices high, they will risk eventually going bankrupt as other cheaper alternatives become available, and to be honest, most of them can't afford to make that gamble.
I mean, sure, for the price of graphics cards.
I meant if car manufacturers and other manufacturers are okay buying chips at this increased price, then the chip manufacturers will have no reason to decrease prices (maybe a little, but not to pre-covid levels).

So then the companies making graphics cards will need to decide between increasing their prices or eating the increased costs. They will probably settle somewhere part way for products that have more price-sensitive consumers.

I am not very 'in-the-know', but I feel like most microchips are sold to other industries than computer components.
If the chip makers are taking excessive prices for their product, the companies that need them will simply find a vendor with lower prices. Price fixing cartels are pretty much illegal everywhere, so it'll sort itself out.
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Post by Dunharrow » 6 months ago

Krishnath wrote:
6 months ago
Dunharrow wrote:
6 months ago
Krishnath wrote:
6 months ago


Most people aren't willing to pay the new prices. Only the people who are already wealthy are willing to pay those prices. I for one am not willing to pay twice what I get in my disability pension to get a graphics card. The prices are entirely caused by scarcity, and nothing else. Once the production normalizes the companies will have to choose, either keep the prices high and carter to a tiny clientele, or reduce the prices to a level where a majority of people can afford. If they keep the prices high, they will risk eventually going bankrupt as other cheaper alternatives become available, and to be honest, most of them can't afford to make that gamble.
I mean, sure, for the price of graphics cards.
I meant if car manufacturers and other manufacturers are okay buying chips at this increased price, then the chip manufacturers will have no reason to decrease prices (maybe a little, but not to pre-covid levels).

So then the companies making graphics cards will need to decide between increasing their prices or eating the increased costs. They will probably settle somewhere part way for products that have more price-sensitive consumers.

I am not very 'in-the-know', but I feel like most microchips are sold to other industries than computer components.
If the chip makers are taking excessive prices for their product, the companies that need them will simply find a vendor with lower prices. Price fixing cartels are pretty much illegal everywhere, so it'll sort itself out.
Hope so. Obviously, they can't do what the oil industry does.

Looking at a similar situation with Nitrile gloves. Gloves have skyrocketed in price as there is a global backorder for over a year now.

Just keep in mind that it could be a long time before the market restabilizes, by which time the new price could easily be 20-40% higher than the original price before COVID.
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Post by Krishnath » 6 months ago

Dunharrow wrote:
6 months ago
Hope so. Obviously, they can't do what the oil industry does.

Looking at a similar situation with Nitrile gloves. Gloves have skyrocketed in price as there is a global backorder for over a year now.

Just keep in mind that it could be a long time before the market restabilizes, by which time the new price could easily be 20-40% higher than the original price before COVID.
Good thing that Europe isn't overly reliant on the middle-east for oil then, and we are actively taking steps to remove our reliance on it, opting for going green as it is.

But the Oil Industry here has gotten in trouble more than once over price-fixing, If I recall correctly, the last time they did it, they had to pay something like fifty billion euro's in fines due to their practices. But it did lead Europe to start investing in green tech research such as wind and solar.
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Post by SocorroTortoise » 6 months ago

Krishnath wrote:
6 months ago
If the chip makers are taking excessive prices for their product, the companies that need them will simply find a vendor with lower prices. Price fixing cartels are pretty much illegal everywhere, so it'll sort itself out.
That's more difficult when you're talking silicon foundries. I don't think there are all that many with the capability for the process nodes that high end consumer electronics use. There's a lot of demand for them between the mobile industry and increased interest in infotainment systems in the automotive industry, so disruptions to those supply chains do actually result in higher prices for typical economic reasons and not because of price fixing. Finding a vendor with lower prices means waiting on a different silicon company to build a foundry that can produce a large volume of working chips at the right process node, which is expensive and time consuming. I'm honestly not sure whether there's anyone other than TSMC and Samsung capable of that right now.

Disclaimer: While I do have some working knowledge of all this because I work in the industry, I'm not involved directly with the silicon aspect nor with the financial aspect. It's more than possible that there are factors (and foundries) I'm not aware of.
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Post by Krishnath » 6 months ago

SocorroTortoise wrote:
6 months ago
Krishnath wrote:
6 months ago
If the chip makers are taking excessive prices for their product, the companies that need them will simply find a vendor with lower prices. Price fixing cartels are pretty much illegal everywhere, so it'll sort itself out.
That's more difficult when you're talking silicon foundries. I don't think there are all that many with the capability for the process nodes that high end consumer electronics use. There's a lot of demand for them between the mobile industry and increased interest in infotainment systems in the automotive industry, so disruptions to those supply chains do actually result in higher prices for typical economic reasons and not because of price fixing. Finding a vendor with lower prices means waiting on a different silicon company to build a foundry that can produce a large volume of working chips at the right process node, which is expensive and time consuming. I'm honestly not sure whether there's anyone other than TSMC and Samsung capable of that right now.

Disclaimer: While I do have some working knowledge of all this because I work in the industry, I'm not involved directly with the silicon aspect nor with the financial aspect. It's more than possible that there are factors (and foundries) I'm not aware of.
While that is true, the simple fact is, if people can't afford it, it won't sell, which drives the price down. 🤷
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Post by Hermes_ » 6 months ago

SocorroTortoise wrote:
6 months ago
Krishnath wrote:
6 months ago
If the chip makers are taking excessive prices for their product, the companies that need them will simply find a vendor with lower prices. Price fixing cartels are pretty much illegal everywhere, so it'll sort itself out.
That's more difficult when you're talking silicon foundries. I don't think there are all that many with the capability for the process nodes that high end consumer electronics use. There's a lot of demand for them between the mobile industry and increased interest in infotainment systems in the automotive industry, so disruptions to those supply chains do actually result in higher prices for typical economic reasons and not because of price fixing. Finding a vendor with lower prices means waiting on a different silicon company to build a foundry that can produce a large volume of working chips at the right process node, which is expensive and time consuming. I'm honestly not sure whether there's anyone other than TSMC and Samsung capable of that right now.

Disclaimer: While I do have some working knowledge of all this because I work in the industry, I'm not involved directly with the silicon aspect nor with the financial aspect. It's more than possible that there are factors (and foundries) I'm not aware of.
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Post by lyonhaert » 6 months ago

MeowZeDung wrote:
6 months ago
My wife and I just finished paying off a debt and had some funds leftover, so we ordered a much needed new mattress and set of sheets.

...I haven't been so excited for something in quite some time.

Adulthood. Geesh.
It is definitely nice to have some extra funds to get some things done.

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Post by Hermes_ » 6 months ago

@cryogen think you could do a plank? https://www.yahoo.com/news/army-revamps ... 37071.html
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Post by Dunharrow » 6 months ago

Krishnath wrote:
6 months ago
SocorroTortoise wrote:
6 months ago
Krishnath wrote:
6 months ago
If the chip makers are taking excessive prices for their product, the companies that need them will simply find a vendor with lower prices. Price fixing cartels are pretty much illegal everywhere, so it'll sort itself out.
That's more difficult when you're talking silicon foundries. I don't think there are all that many with the capability for the process nodes that high end consumer electronics use. There's a lot of demand for them between the mobile industry and increased interest in infotainment systems in the automotive industry, so disruptions to those supply chains do actually result in higher prices for typical economic reasons and not because of price fixing. Finding a vendor with lower prices means waiting on a different silicon company to build a foundry that can produce a large volume of working chips at the right process node, which is expensive and time consuming. I'm honestly not sure whether there's anyone other than TSMC and Samsung capable of that right now.

Disclaimer: While I do have some working knowledge of all this because I work in the industry, I'm not involved directly with the silicon aspect nor with the financial aspect. It's more than possible that there are factors (and foundries) I'm not aware of.
While that is true, the simple fact is, if people can't afford it, it won't sell, which drives the price down. 🤷
But that's just it - people can afford it. There may be backlash from the gaming community, but the automotive industry will keep buying (as well as other industries). I don't think the price will settle anywhere near where it was before.
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Post by Krishnath » 6 months ago

Dunharrow wrote:
6 months ago
Krishnath wrote:
6 months ago
SocorroTortoise wrote:
6 months ago
That's more difficult when you're talking silicon foundries. I don't think there are all that many with the capability for the process nodes that high end consumer electronics use. There's a lot of demand for them between the mobile industry and increased interest in infotainment systems in the automotive industry, so disruptions to those supply chains do actually result in higher prices for typical economic reasons and not because of price fixing. Finding a vendor with lower prices means waiting on a different silicon company to build a foundry that can produce a large volume of working chips at the right process node, which is expensive and time consuming. I'm honestly not sure whether there's anyone other than TSMC and Samsung capable of that right now.

Disclaimer: While I do have some working knowledge of all this because I work in the industry, I'm not involved directly with the silicon aspect nor with the financial aspect. It's more than possible that there are factors (and foundries) I'm not aware of.
While that is true, the simple fact is, if people can't afford it, it won't sell, which drives the price down. 🤷
But that's just it - people can afford it. There may be backlash from the gaming community, but the automotive industry will keep buying (as well as other industries). I don't think the price will settle anywhere near where it was before.
The vast majority of people can't afford it. An average graphics card costs more than what the average person makes in a month over here. That is a heck of a lot of money, for an *average* graphics card. For a good one, you'd have to pay anywhere between twice and five times that. So no, while a few people can afford it, not enough can to make it economically viable in the long run. Heck, even my graphics card, that is almost four years old by now, costs almost 1000€ to purchase, on average. That's a lot of friggin' money.
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Post by Dunharrow » 6 months ago

Krishnath wrote:
6 months ago
Dunharrow wrote:
6 months ago
Krishnath wrote:
6 months ago


While that is true, the simple fact is, if people can't afford it, it won't sell, which drives the price down. 🤷
But that's just it - people can afford it. There may be backlash from the gaming community, but the automotive industry will keep buying (as well as other industries). I don't think the price will settle anywhere near where it was before.
The vast majority of people can't afford it. An average graphics card costs more than what the average person makes in a month over here. That is a heck of a lot of money, for an *average* graphics card. For a good one, you'd have to pay anywhere between twice and five times that. So no, while a few people can afford it, not enough can to make it economically viable in the long run. Heck, even my graphics card, that is almost four years old by now, costs almost 1000€ to purchase, on average. That's a lot of friggin' money.
Maybe. Of course, that is all subjective. But my point was that there are a lot of industries that buy a lot of chips. Cars. appliances, laboratory equipment, military, etc.
Until production increases substantially, prices will hold, because these industries will not stop buying chips. Middle Class gamers are just one consumer segment.
When manufacturing is running 24/7 costs go up.
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Post by Krishnath » 6 months ago

Dunharrow wrote:
6 months ago
Krishnath wrote:
6 months ago
Dunharrow wrote:
6 months ago

But that's just it - people can afford it. There may be backlash from the gaming community, but the automotive industry will keep buying (as well as other industries). I don't think the price will settle anywhere near where it was before.
The vast majority of people can't afford it. An average graphics card costs more than what the average person makes in a month over here. That is a heck of a lot of money, for an *average* graphics card. For a good one, you'd have to pay anywhere between twice and five times that. So no, while a few people can afford it, not enough can to make it economically viable in the long run. Heck, even my graphics card, that is almost four years old by now, costs almost 1000€ to purchase, on average. That's a lot of friggin' money.
Maybe. Of course, that is all subjective. But my point was that there are a lot of industries that buy a lot of chips. Cars. appliances, laboratory equipment, military, etc.
Until production increases substantially, prices will hold, because these industries will not stop buying chips. Middle Class gamers are just one consumer segment.
When manufacturing is running 24/7 costs go up.
And those manufacturers will start looking at other options if the producers keep the prices high, as it would either cause them losses, or force them to increase their prices, thus reducing the amount of product they could sell. So, when the manufacturers switch to a cheaper source, the ones who keep the higher price would be forced to reduce their prices or simply get, well, muscled out of the market. As I said, it'll all even out once international production and transport gets sorted out, which will happen once enough people are vaccinated.
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Post by Dunharrow » 6 months ago

Krishnath wrote:
6 months ago
Dunharrow wrote:
6 months ago
Krishnath wrote:
6 months ago


The vast majority of people can't afford it. An average graphics card costs more than what the average person makes in a month over here. That is a heck of a lot of money, for an *average* graphics card. For a good one, you'd have to pay anywhere between twice and five times that. So no, while a few people can afford it, not enough can to make it economically viable in the long run. Heck, even my graphics card, that is almost four years old by now, costs almost 1000€ to purchase, on average. That's a lot of friggin' money.
Maybe. Of course, that is all subjective. But my point was that there are a lot of industries that buy a lot of chips. Cars. appliances, laboratory equipment, military, etc.
Until production increases substantially, prices will hold, because these industries will not stop buying chips. Middle Class gamers are just one consumer segment.
When manufacturing is running 24/7 costs go up.
And those manufacturers will start looking at other options if the producers keep the prices high, as it would either cause them losses, or force them to increase their prices, thus reducing the amount of product they could sell. So, when the manufacturers switch to a cheaper source, the ones who keep the higher price would be forced to reduce their prices or simply get, well, muscled out of the market. As I said, it'll all even out once international production and transport gets sorted out, which will happen once enough people are vaccinated.
I think you are overly optimistic about how fast production and transport will get sorted out. If the chip industry stopped getting orders today, how long do you think it would take to fulfill all the backorders?
Maybe this time next year prices will have gone down... but my bet is on the prices settling somewhere between the pre-covid price and the current price, unless advances are made that make for cheaper production.
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Post by Krishnath » 6 months ago

Dunharrow wrote:
6 months ago
Krishnath wrote:
6 months ago
Dunharrow wrote:
6 months ago


Maybe. Of course, that is all subjective. But my point was that there are a lot of industries that buy a lot of chips. Cars. appliances, laboratory equipment, military, etc.
Until production increases substantially, prices will hold, because these industries will not stop buying chips. Middle Class gamers are just one consumer segment.
When manufacturing is running 24/7 costs go up.
And those manufacturers will start looking at other options if the producers keep the prices high, as it would either cause them losses, or force them to increase their prices, thus reducing the amount of product they could sell. So, when the manufacturers switch to a cheaper source, the ones who keep the higher price would be forced to reduce their prices or simply get, well, muscled out of the market. As I said, it'll all even out once international production and transport gets sorted out, which will happen once enough people are vaccinated.
I think you are overly optimistic about how fast production and transport will get sorted out. If the chip industry stopped getting orders today, how long do you think it would take to fulfill all the backorders?
Maybe this time next year prices will have gone down... but my bet is on the prices settling somewhere between the pre-covid price and the current price, unless advances are made that make for cheaper production.
I have no delusions about the timeframe, it'll take time, but prices will normalize eventually.
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Post by Guardman » 6 months ago

Krishnath wrote:
6 months ago
Dunharrow wrote:
6 months ago
Krishnath wrote:
6 months ago


The vast majority of people can't afford it. An average graphics card costs more than what the average person makes in a month over here. That is a heck of a lot of money, for an *average* graphics card. For a good one, you'd have to pay anywhere between twice and five times that. So no, while a few people can afford it, not enough can to make it economically viable in the long run. Heck, even my graphics card, that is almost four years old by now, costs almost 1000€ to purchase, on average. That's a lot of friggin' money.
Maybe. Of course, that is all subjective. But my point was that there are a lot of industries that buy a lot of chips. Cars. appliances, laboratory equipment, military, etc.
Until production increases substantially, prices will hold, because these industries will not stop buying chips. Middle Class gamers are just one consumer segment.
When manufacturing is running 24/7 costs go up.
And those manufacturers will start looking at other options if the producers keep the prices high, as it would either cause them losses, or force them to increase their prices, thus reducing the amount of product they could sell. So, when the manufacturers switch to a cheaper source, the ones who keep the higher price would be forced to reduce their prices or simply get, well, muscled out of the market. As I said, it'll all even out once international production and transport gets sorted out, which will happen once enough people are vaccinated.
Unfortunately, that is at best a few years away. As I understand it there just aren't any low cost alternative providers. All current providers are at full throttle. And there are two big factors that are contributing to this.

1. Making chips is complex and you just can't wave a wand and increase capacity. It takes time and significant investment to build the semiconductors to make chips.

2. A lack of rare earth metal. Rare earth metals are vital to making chips and all rare earth metals are being used faster than they can be mined.

And this outlook assumes that demand will not continue to climb at the pace it has been in the past few years. If it does, then we might be looking at this chip shortage for at least a decade (my blind guestimate, do not hold me to this timeline).

Also at the end of February President Biden signed an executive order looking into the lack of chips, but from the responses of people in the industry there is little the executive order can do in the short term since most of the world's computer chips are made in China and Taiwan.

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Krishnath
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Post by Krishnath » 6 months ago

Guardman wrote:
6 months ago
2. A lack of rare earth metal. Rare earth metals are vital to making chips and all rare earth metals are being used faster than they can be mined.
This right here is the primary reason for the chip shortage, there is simply not enough resources getting mined right now due to the pandemic. Most, if not all countries where these materials are mined are having export issues.
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Post by SocorroTortoise » 6 months ago

There are a couple things about that list that aren't immediately apparent. The first is that TSMC is the market leader, but not even all of their foundries can produce the 7nm process node that the higher end Nvidia/AMD graphics cards are using. There's a lot of demand for that in currently available and upcoming products. On that list, Samsung already has the capability and I know GlobalFoundries was also working on 7nm (I don't know if they're at the point where they could be considered a reasonable alternative to TSMC and Samsung). The second is that for the other companies listed and related to premium tier electronics, it doesn't matter if a foundry can produce 300 mm wafers if they're at the 14nm process node - they'll never be an actual alternative if they can't meet the performance standard the chip needs. Beyond that, even if the company has the time, money, and expertise necessary to build a foundry that can handle a smaller process node, they need to hit pretty strict reliability standards before they would even be a consideration for a company looking for a supplier. It's a tough sell for a company to spends years and billions of dollars before having any chance of seeing a return on investment. They also have to overcome the hurdle of their potential customers having entrenched relationships with existing suppliers, so even in the best case any early sales are going to be small scale.

Now a bunch of disclaimers. First, all of that isn't to say it's impossible for another company to break into the high end silicon market (GlobalFoundries is a relatively new company, for example), just that it's more likely we're going to see the current supply problems resolved by the existing options well before another player enters the market. Second, this applies primarily to higher end electronics. Lower tiers typically use larger process nodes and as such have more options, even if that's just additional foundries owned by the same supplier. Third, this is only addressing the particular suggestion that manufacturers will switch to a lower cost supplier and why it's unlikely, at least in the near term. Finally, this is still not my direct area of expertise, I just have a little more of an industry perspective on the requirements of the chips and some of the design and test process (I work on the test platform design side of things).
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Post by Hermes_ » 6 months ago

SocorroTortoise wrote:
6 months ago
There are a couple things about that list that aren't immediately apparent.
I only posted the list because you said you weren't sure about other foundries.
Krishnath wrote:
6 months ago
Dunharrow wrote:
6 months ago
Krishnath wrote:
6 months ago
While that is true, the simple fact is, if people can't afford it, it won't sell, which drives the price down. 🤷
But that's just it - people can afford it. There may be backlash from the gaming community, but the automotive industry will keep buying (as well as other industries). I don't think the price will settle anywhere near where it was before.
The vast majority of people can't afford it. An average graphics card costs more than what the average person makes in a month over here. That is a heck of a lot of money, for an *average* graphics card. For a good one, you'd have to pay anywhere between twice and five times that. So no, while a few people can afford it, not enough can to make it economically viable in the long run. Heck, even my graphics card, that is almost four years old by now, costs almost 1000€ to purchase, on average. That's a lot of friggin' money.
Over where you live,but in a lot of places folks ARE able to afford it many times over. Here's a pic of someone's mining rig from redditImage others are posting the following : 1 5700xt, 4 1660 supers, 2 2060's, 1 2070 super.

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